& Other Stories Review

I recently went into a roomy & Other Stories store in Coal Drop yard, King’s Cross, London.   & Other Stories was my favourite shopping destination before I committed to a year of buying secondhand clothes exclusively.  I’d almost forgotten how much I love this brand – they just get everything so right.  The knitwear withContinue reading “& Other Stories Review”

Are fashion B Corps really sustainable?

When you love clothes but don’t love what they’re doing to the planet and people, it can be difficult to know which fashion brands to choose.  The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) recently announced that they’re to investigate greenwashing in fashion, and will examine claims that individual items of clothing are better for the environment,Continue reading “Are fashion B Corps really sustainable?”

New Year Fashion Resolutions

Happy new year! Do you make new year resolutions? I do. Mine are about making my life more fun and enjoyable, as well as self improvement. I plan to continue meditating, but have also got some fun easy wins on my list such as watching a Korean film and getting a massage. The full listContinue reading “New Year Fashion Resolutions”

The three best sustainable fashion innovations of 2021

‘Time’ magazine recently published its list of best inventions of the year.  It’s remarkable how many of these incorporate sustainability thinking.  Everist’s Waterless Shampoo Concentrate is 100% plant-based, plastic free and eliminates the water which makes up 70% of the contents of a standard shampoo bottle. Kuleana is perfect for anyone who went completely offContinue reading “The three best sustainable fashion innovations of 2021”

Primark enters the circular economy

Critics of fast fashion often reach for Primark as an example of everything that’s wrong with the industry: exploited garment workers, clothes made from damaging synthetic materials and garments designed to be worn just a few times before being dumped into landfill. Primark seems an unlikely partner for the Ellen McArthur Foundation, a leading organisation dedicated to acceleratingContinue reading “Primark enters the circular economy”

Fashion brands that will repair your clothes and accessories

Levi’s slogan back in the day was “The more you wash ‘em, the better they look and fit.’” Favourite jeans you’d worn in looked better than a brand-new pair, so Levi’s were designed to withstand years of washing and wearing.  Making a virtue of clothes lasting years is making a comeback – there’s a growingContinue reading “Fashion brands that will repair your clothes and accessories”

How a year of blogging has changed me

Today is my blog-iversary: I was thinking yesterday that it must be about a year since I started this blog.  I just looked and my first ever post was on October 25th 2020 – exactly a year ago today.  I am no longer terrified of sharing photos of myself When I uploaded my first post,Continue reading “How a year of blogging has changed me”

Can the Circular Economy solve fashion’s environmental problems? 

The fashion industry generates a huge quantity of waste.   One of the most quoted statistics about the environmental impacts of clothing is that 300,000 tonnes of clothing find their way to landfill every year in the UK.  This statistic comes from the Waste Resources Action Plan (WRAP) in their excellent 2017 report ‘Valuing Our Clothes’. Continue reading “Can the Circular Economy solve fashion’s environmental problems? “

Oh sew simple

The Environmental Audit Committee recommended that students be taught sewing skills in schools.  The reason?  Most clothes end up in landfill.  In fact, every second, the equivalent of a rubbish truck load of clothes is burnt or buried in landfill. Given the low prices of clothes these days from supermarkets, Boohoo.com or Primark, most peopleContinue reading “Oh sew simple”

Privilege and sustainable fashion

A pink gingham midi shift dress by ethical and sustainable London-based brand Birdsong costs £169; a similar style from H&M will do much less damage to your pocket, at £19.99.  One dress is made from Tencel fabric made from wood pulp, sustainably harvested from renewable wood sources, and was made in London for living wages. Continue reading “Privilege and sustainable fashion”